1D3D3701.jpg

In the City

In the City birds use ingenuity to make the most of the new environment, an important refuge as their original habitat disappears. Parks, trees and suburban gardens with shrubs are now important retreats for many birds. Once a year citizen scientists across Australia count the birds in their backyard in The Aussie Backyard Bird Count, a Birdlife Australia initiative to highlight the importance of city and town birds.

Photo:The Rainbow Lorikeet was the number one bird seen across Australia in the Aussie Backyard Bird Count in 2018, the same as in 2017.

Second most common bird was the Noisy Miner, the most aggressive of the Honeyeater family; known for chasing other birds and taking prime nesting sites.

Second most common bird was the Noisy Miner, the most aggressive of the Honeyeater family; known for chasing other birds and taking prime nesting sites.

In third place was the Australian Magpie, common in cities and the bush. Magpies prefer open spaces with large trees (city parks) feeding mainly on grubs and insects.

In third place was the Australian Magpie, common in cities and the bush. Magpies prefer open spaces with large trees (city parks) feeding mainly on grubs and insects.

At number four the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo is a large noisy parrot with a strong beak suitable for its diet of berries, seeds, nuts and roots.

At number four the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo is a large noisy parrot with a strong beak suitable for its diet of berries, seeds, nuts and roots.

Fifth place the introduced House Sparrow numbers are decreasing in many cities but are still common in Tasmania, along with Blackbirds and Starlings.

Fifth place the introduced House Sparrow numbers are decreasing in many cities but are still common in Tasmania, along with Blackbirds and Starlings.

Number six was the Galah, a beautiful parrot seen in most Australian cities. The Galah is a seed eater that also raids farmer’s fields for grain.

Number six was the Galah, a beautiful parrot seen in most Australian cities. The Galah is a seed eater that also raids farmer’s fields for grain.

At seven, the Silver Gull, a scavenger from the beach, finds that city streets and parks are plentiful sources of food.

At seven, the Silver Gull, a scavenger from the beach, finds that city streets and parks are plentiful sources of food.

The Common Myna takes eighth place. Often regarded as a pest, the Common Myna is losing out to its Australian cousin, the Noisy Miner.

The Common Myna takes eighth place. Often regarded as a pest, the Common Myna is losing out to its Australian cousin, the Noisy Miner.

In ninth place, Welcome Swallows swoop for insects over parks, playgrounds and ponds.

In ninth place, Welcome Swallows swoop for insects over parks, playgrounds and ponds.

At ten comes the Red Wattlebird, a large honeyeater well suited to take nectar from the large flowered grevilleas favoured in suburban gardens.

At ten comes the Red Wattlebird, a large honeyeater well suited to take nectar from the large flowered grevilleas favoured in suburban gardens.

Another common bird in city and bush, these Magpie-larks successfully raise a family in this unusual nesting spot!

Another common bird in city and bush, these Magpie-larks successfully raise a family in this unusual nesting spot!

This Cuckoo, the Common Koel, heralds the arrival of spring after spending winter north of Australia.

This Cuckoo, the Common Koel, heralds the arrival of spring after spending winter north of Australia.

Pied Currawongs are another successful city bird, competing with and displacing smaller birds.

Pied Currawongs are another successful city bird, competing with and displacing smaller birds.

Expect the unexpected. If you go to Sydney's Olympic Park you might see this Royal Spoonbill feeding!

Expect the unexpected. If you go to Sydney's Olympic Park you might see this Royal Spoonbill feeding!

The song of the Laughing Kookaburra is an Australian icon, heard daily in the city as well as the bush.

The song of the Laughing Kookaburra is an Australian icon, heard daily in the city as well as the bush.

Pacific Black Ducks have adapted well to city life making the most of parks, ponds and picnic left overs.

Pacific Black Ducks have adapted well to city life making the most of parks, ponds and picnic left overs.