1D3C2126.jpg

Cowra NSW

Early settlers cleared ninety percent of NSW woodlands to farm crops, meat and wool. Now concerned landowners have initiated the Cowra Woodland Birds Program to replant bush, fence existing bush, and monitor bird numbers. Woodland birds are seen at Conimbla National Park, Koorawatha Nature Reserve and Wyangala Dam and smaller well-treed bush remnants of the Lachlan river valley.

Link to Bird Routes of Cowra District for bird-watching sites.

Photo: The Eastern Rosella, shown here at the Japanese Garden and Peace Precinct in Cowra; likes open woodlands and farmlands and feed on seeds, fruit, nectar and insects.

The Superb Parrot is a charismatic but vulnerable resident of the woodlands. The “Saving our Superb Parrot” conservation program funded by the NSW government aims to plant paddock trees, plant wattles and hopbush - food for Superbs, and create nesting hollows in existing trees. It looks at ways to prevent roadkill of parrots feeding on grain on the road.

The Superb Parrot is a charismatic but vulnerable resident of the woodlands. The “Saving our Superb Parrot” conservation program funded by the NSW government aims to plant paddock trees, plant wattles and hopbush - food for Superbs, and create nesting hollows in existing trees. It looks at ways to prevent roadkill of parrots feeding on grain on the road.

The Red-capped Robin, a small bird (12 cms length), is found across the drier areas of mid and southern Australia. It inhabits scrub and open woodlands feeding on spiders, beetles, ants and other insects. It often feeds on the ground, flying to low branches and fence-posts when disturbed. Here seen close to Conimbla National Park.

The Red-capped Robin, a small bird (12 cms length), is found across the drier areas of mid and southern Australia. It inhabits scrub and open woodlands feeding on spiders, beetles, ants and other insects. It often feeds on the ground, flying to low branches and fence-posts when disturbed. Here seen close to Conimbla National Park.

White-winged Chough, a large bird (47cm), found across the south-east states of Australia. Usually seen in family groups of five to ten birds moving across the farm landscape and sheltering and nesting in adjacent trees. Choughs feed on beetles, termites and other insects as well as a variety of grass seeds. They make a mud nest with all family members helping raise the young.

White-winged Chough, a large bird (47cm), found across the south-east states of Australia. Usually seen in family groups of five to ten birds moving across the farm landscape and sheltering and nesting in adjacent trees. Choughs feed on beetles, termites and other insects as well as a variety of grass seeds. They make a mud nest with all family members helping raise the young.

Galahs at a farm south of Cowra, feeding on seeds from the ground. Galahs are found across most of Australia. They have benefited from land clearing and have exploited the new food sources as grain crops expand across the Woodland areas.

Galahs at a farm south of Cowra, feeding on seeds from the ground. Galahs are found across most of Australia. They have benefited from land clearing and have exploited the new food sources as grain crops expand across the Woodland areas.

The charming Grey-crowned Babbler is usually seen in a noisy family group of up to ten or more birds, chatting away in a soft nasal twitter. They feed on insects and occasionally seeds. This bird was seen at Morongla Cemetery near Cowra.

The charming Grey-crowned Babbler is usually seen in a noisy family group of up to ten or more birds, chatting away in a soft nasal twitter. They feed on insects and occasionally seeds. This bird was seen at Morongla Cemetery near Cowra.

The Barking Owl is rarely seen but their distinctive "little dog" barking call may be heard at night.They frequent where forest meets farmland especially in river side trees. The two owls above are roosting close to a small stream that will provide their fare of small animals, birds, reptiles and insects.

The Barking Owl is rarely seen but their distinctive "little dog" barking call may be heard at night.They frequent where forest meets farmland especially in river side trees. The two owls above are roosting close to a small stream that will provide their fare of small animals, birds, reptiles and insects.

Straw-necked Ibis are grassland birds, feeding in large flocks on insects such as grasshoppers. They are seen across most Australian farming regions and fly long distances in response to seasonal conditions. Unlike their city cousin the Australian White Ibis they rarely scavenge for food.

Straw-necked Ibis are grassland birds, feeding in large flocks on insects such as grasshoppers. They are seen across most Australian farming regions and fly long distances in response to seasonal conditions. Unlike their city cousin the Australian White Ibis they rarely scavenge for food.

The Crested Shrike-tit is an insect eating bird but occasionally eats seeds and fruit. It uses its strong short bill to tear bark from trees and find insects. This bird was on a bush regeneration site planted by participants in the Cowra Woodland Birds Program.

The Crested Shrike-tit is an insect eating bird but occasionally eats seeds and fruit. It uses its strong short bill to tear bark from trees and find insects. This bird was on a bush regeneration site planted by participants in the Cowra Woodland Birds Program.

Brown Falcons, a medium sized raptor ( 50 cm in length), frequent open woodlands and farmland, watching for prey from trees and from power poles. The Brown Falcon swoops on its prey, killing with a bite from its powerful bill. They feed on small mammals, insects and reptiles.

Brown Falcons, a medium sized raptor ( 50 cm in length), frequent open woodlands and farmland, watching for prey from trees and from power poles. The Brown Falcon swoops on its prey, killing with a bite from its powerful bill. They feed on small mammals, insects and reptiles.

This Double-barred Finch was feeding on the seeds of roadside grasses when disturbed. Cowra is towards the south of the range of this east coast and northern Australian bird.

This Double-barred Finch was feeding on the seeds of roadside grasses when disturbed. Cowra is towards the south of the range of this east coast and northern Australian bird.

An immigrant from Europe, the Common Starling has thrived across the grasslands and farmlands of southeast Australia. Starlings feed on seeds and insects from the ground in flocks that vary from a few to many hundreds of birds.

An immigrant from Europe, the Common Starling has thrived across the grasslands and farmlands of southeast Australia. Starlings feed on seeds and insects from the ground in flocks that vary from a few to many hundreds of birds.

Eastern Yellow Robin at Conimbla National Park. Eastern Yellow Robins are found along eastern Australia from north Queensland to southern South Australia.

Eastern Yellow Robin at Conimbla National Park. Eastern Yellow Robins are found along eastern Australia from north Queensland to southern South Australia.

Speckled Warbler at Conimbla National Park. Speckled Warblers forage through leaf litter and grass, feeding on insects and seeds. They are listed as a “vulnerable” species in NSW and Victoria and extend into southern Queensland.

Speckled Warbler at Conimbla National Park. Speckled Warblers forage through leaf litter and grass, feeding on insects and seeds. They are listed as a “vulnerable” species in NSW and Victoria and extend into southern Queensland.